How is a Hearing Aid Dome Measured?

 

The dome is arguably one of the most important components of your hearing aid. Proper sizing is crucial for the device's functionality.   

Proper hearing aid dome sizing can be the difference between hearing your surroundings clearly and being treated to a cacophony of feedback. Today, we're going to talk a bit about what that sizing involves. But first, we'll start with an overview of what a dome actually is.

 

What Is a Hearing Aid Dome?

There are many different hearing aid styles. Used primarily for receiver-in-ear (RIE) and behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aids, the dome is a small silicone or plastic covering that goes over the receiver. It serves a dual purpose. First, it helps anchor the receiver inside the ear, much like an earbud on a pair of headphones. 

It also helps direct or funnel sound from the receiver into the ear canal.

 

Are Hearing Aid Domes Necessary?

Yes and no. Generally speaking, you're going to be choosing between either a dome or an earmold. For the most part, domes are intended for people with mild to moderate hearing loss, while earmolds are used by anyone with severe or profound hearing loss. The main difference between the two is that domes are interchangeable and come in preset sizes, while earmolds are fitted directly to a patient's ear.

 

What Are the Different Types of Hearing Aid Dome?

There are three types of hearing aid domes in total, each with its own advantages, drawbacks, and ideal use case.

 

  • Open Hearing Aid Domes

As the name suggests, open domes allow natural sound to pass through the dome into the ear. On the one hand, this helps the sound delivered by the hearing aid to sound more natural, particularly where environmental noise is concerned. On the other hand, open domes tend to have issues with sound leakage, aren't as well-suited for low-frequency sound, and tend to require slightly more power than other dome styles. 

Open hearing aid domes are also designed to prevent a phenomenon known as the occlusion effect.

Basically, this refers to hearing one's own voice as a sort of booming echo. If you want to experience this, simply plug your ears and try speaking. Typically, the occlusion effect is not an issue for individuals with severe or profound hearing loss. 

Coincidentally, the occlusion effect is why earmold hearing aids aren't generally recommended to anyone with severe hearing loss.

 

  • Closed Hearing Aid Domes

Also known as tulip domes, closed hearing aid domes have slightly less venting than open domes. This allows them to offer better amplification of low-frequency sounds compared to open domes. Closed domes tend to convey higher-frequency sounds as slightly muted or muddied.

 

  • Power Hearing Aid Domes

Power hearing aid domes block the entire ear canal, eliminating environmental feedback and forming a complete seal. They're intended for individuals with severe or profound hearing loss. Generally speaking, however, earmolds are often a better choice than power domes, as they can be fitted specifically to one's ear. 

 

Why Is Dome Size Important?

Because domes aren't custom-fitted, dome measurement and selection is effectively a matter of finding the one that most closely matches a patient's ears. When fitting a new hearing aid, the audiologist will test a few different dome sizes. A properly fitted dome will be just slightly larger than the ear canal so that it can stay put, but not large enough that it's uncomfortable.

 

How Can You Tell Your Hearing Aid Dome is the Right Size?

Dome size is more than just a matter of comfort.  And it will usually be apparent very quickly if a hearing aid dome is improperly fitted. 

If a dome is too small, there may be too much feedback for the hearing aid to function. It may not even emit sound at all. An undersized dome usually won't stay put inside one's ear, either. 

On the other hand, if the dome is too large, it will quickly begin to feel uncomfortable. It will likely cause some irritation, or even soreness and swelling. In the worst-case scenario, an oversized dome may even end up getting stuck in your ear canal.

If this happens, do not attempt to remove it yourself. You run the risk of lodging it even deeper into your ear by doing so, potentially even damaging your eardrum in the process. Instead, pay a visit to urgent care or your general practitioner to have them deal with it for you.


How is a Hearing Aid Dome Measured?

 

The dome is arguably one of the most important components of your hearing aid. Proper sizing is crucial for the device's functionality.   

Proper hearing aid dome sizing can be the difference between hearing your surroundings clearly and being treated to a cacophony of feedback. Today, we're going to talk a bit about what that sizing involves. But first, we'll start with an overview of what a dome actually is.

 

What Is a Hearing Aid Dome?

There are many different hearing aid styles. Used primarily for receiver-in-ear (RIE) and behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aids, the dome is a small silicone or plastic covering that goes over the receiver. It serves a dual purpose. First, it helps anchor the receiver inside the ear, much like an earbud on a pair of headphones. 

It also helps direct or funnel sound from the receiver into the ear canal.

 

Are Hearing Aid Domes Necessary?

Yes and no. Generally speaking, you're going to be choosing between either a dome or an earmold. For the most part, domes are intended for people with mild to moderate hearing loss, while earmolds are used by anyone with severe or profound hearing loss. The main difference between the two is that domes are interchangeable and come in preset sizes, while earmolds are fitted directly to a patient's ear.

 

What Are the Different Types of Hearing Aid Dome?

There are three types of hearing aid domes in total, each with its own advantages, drawbacks, and ideal use case.

 

  • Open Hearing Aid Domes

As the name suggests, open domes allow natural sound to pass through the dome into the ear. On the one hand, this helps the sound delivered by the hearing aid to sound more natural, particularly where environmental noise is concerned. On the other hand, open domes tend to have issues with sound leakage, aren't as well-suited for low-frequency sound, and tend to require slightly more power than other dome styles. 

Open hearing aid domes are also designed to prevent a phenomenon known as the occlusion effect.

Basically, this refers to hearing one's own voice as a sort of booming echo. If you want to experience this, simply plug your ears and try speaking. Typically, the occlusion effect is not an issue for individuals with severe or profound hearing loss. 

Coincidentally, the occlusion effect is why earmold hearing aids aren't generally recommended to anyone with severe hearing loss.

 

  • Closed Hearing Aid Domes

Also known as tulip domes, closed hearing aid domes have slightly less venting than open domes. This allows them to offer better amplification of low-frequency sounds compared to open domes. Closed domes tend to convey higher-frequency sounds as slightly muted or muddied.

 

  • Power Hearing Aid Domes

Power hearing aid domes block the entire ear canal, eliminating environmental feedback and forming a complete seal. They're intended for individuals with severe or profound hearing loss. Generally speaking, however, earmolds are often a better choice than power domes, as they can be fitted specifically to one's ear. 

 

Why Is Dome Size Important?

Because domes aren't custom-fitted, dome measurement and selection is effectively a matter of finding the one that most closely matches a patient's ears. When fitting a new hearing aid, the audiologist will test a few different dome sizes. A properly fitted dome will be just slightly larger than the ear canal so that it can stay put, but not large enough that it's uncomfortable.

 

How Can You Tell Your Hearing Aid Dome is the Right Size?

Dome size is more than just a matter of comfort.  And it will usually be apparent very quickly if a hearing aid dome is improperly fitted. 

If a dome is too small, there may be too much feedback for the hearing aid to function. It may not even emit sound at all. An undersized dome usually won't stay put inside one's ear, either. 

On the other hand, if the dome is too large, it will quickly begin to feel uncomfortable. It will likely cause some irritation, or even soreness and swelling. In the worst-case scenario, an oversized dome may even end up getting stuck in your ear canal.

If this happens, do not attempt to remove it yourself. You run the risk of lodging it even deeper into your ear by doing so, potentially even damaging your eardrum in the process. Instead, pay a visit to urgent care or your general practitioner to have them deal with it for you.

 

  

  

  

Do you think you might be suffering from hearing loss? Call or chat today to talk with one of our Hearing Consultants:  

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<b>Hearing Aid Domes</b><br> Choose from a variety of domes to suit your hearing aid needs.

Hearing Aid Domes
Choose from a variety of domes to suit your hearing aid needs.