3 Things You Should Know About Troubleshooting Your Hearing Aid

 

Is your hearing aid malfunctioning? We'll help you figure out what might have gone wrong and what you can do to fix it. You'll be back to hearing in no time.    

Your hearing aid is one of the most important pieces of technology you own. Particularly if you're struggling with severe or profound hearing loss, it's effectively your lifeline to the audible world. And when it's not working the way it should be? 

You notice. 

The good news is that modern hearing aids, despite how sophisticated they've become, are surprisingly easy to troubleshoot. We'll walk you through all the first steps you should consider in that process. And if, after trying the following tips, your hearing aid still isn't working, we'll inform you of what to do next.

So, with that in mind, here are three things you should know when troubleshooting your hearing aid.

 

Always Check The Battery First

As with any electronic device, when a hearing aid's battery is dying, its functionality can get a little spotty. For that reason, if your hearing aid seems to be operating at an unusually low or inconsistent volume, your first step should be checking its charge level. 

It could very well be that you simply need to let your hearing aid power up again. That said, the battery could itself be the problem. If your hearing aid seems to work just fine for a few hours before dying on you, there's a good chance the battery may be malfunctioning and needs to be replaced.

 

Try Cleaning Your Hearing Aid

Because hearing aids spend so much time inserted into our ear canal, they're susceptible to the buildup of wax, dead skin, or other debris. Regular cleaning with a specialized set of tools is a critical part of regular hearing aid maintenance. Otherwise,  the device could get clogged and be unable to transmit sound effectively as a result. 

In addition to brushing out obvious wax and debris on a daily basis, you'll want to wipe down your hearing aid with a soft, dry cloth each night before plugging it in to charge. We also recommend regularly cleaning your earmold or dome using warm water and a mild soap. Make absolutely certain every single component of your hearing aid is clean and dry before reassembling it.

 

Consider What's Gone Wrong

If you've checked the battery and cleaned out your hearing aid and that still hasn't solved the problem, it's time to take a step back and think a bit more about the issue. Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Is the hearing aid damp? If there's a chance the hearing aid has been exposed to an abnormal degree of moisture, you'll want to immediately put the device in a dry box or use a drying kit. If you don't have access to either of these tools, you can potentially use a hairdryer or leave the hearing aid in a sealed container full of rice overnight. 

  • Am I experiencing whistling or feedback? This could either be caused by an improper fit or malfunctioning components. There may also be a blockage in your ear canal causing interference. 

  • Is there any discomfort or pain? As with feedback, this is likely caused by an improper fit. You may also need to have your earmold or dome resized. 

  • Is the hearing aid too quiet? While this may be due to malfunctioning components, there's also a good chance that your hearing loss may have progressed, meaning your old hearing aid is no longer sufficient.

Your last course of action prior to consulting an audiologist is to readjust the hearing aid yourself. Modern devices usually make this easy through a companion app. However, if you're using an older hearing aid, this is inadvisable at best and likely near impossible without the necessary expertise.

 

When In Doubt, Always Consult an Audiologist

Ultimately, if you have a hearing aid that's malfunctioning or not performing properly, your best bet is almost always to schedule an appointment with your audiologist. They'll be able to troubleshoot it far more effectively than you can. And in the event that the problem is with your ears rather than the hearing aid, they'll be able to help you determine that, as well.

That's where Connect Hearing comes in. Give us a shout, and we'll get you set up with a free consultation with one of our professional audiologists.

 

3 Things You Should Know About Troubleshooting Your Hearing Aid

 

Is your hearing aid malfunctioning? We'll help you figure out what might have gone wrong and what you can do to fix it. You'll be back to hearing in no time.    

Your hearing aid is one of the most important pieces of technology you own. Particularly if you're struggling with severe or profound hearing loss, it's effectively your lifeline to the audible world. And when it's not working the way it should be? 

You notice. 

The good news is that modern hearing aids, despite how sophisticated they've become, are surprisingly easy to troubleshoot. We'll walk you through all the first steps you should consider in that process. And if, after trying the following tips, your hearing aid still isn't working, we'll inform you of what to do next.

So, with that in mind, here are three things you should know when troubleshooting your hearing aid.

 

Always Check The Battery First

As with any electronic device, when a hearing aid's battery is dying, its functionality can get a little spotty. For that reason, if your hearing aid seems to be operating at an unusually low or inconsistent volume, your first step should be checking its charge level. 

It could very well be that you simply need to let your hearing aid power up again. That said, the battery could itself be the problem. If your hearing aid seems to work just fine for a few hours before dying on you, there's a good chance the battery may be malfunctioning and needs to be replaced.

 

Try Cleaning Your Hearing Aid

Because hearing aids spend so much time inserted into our ear canal, they're susceptible to the buildup of wax, dead skin, or other debris. Regular cleaning with a specialized set of tools is a critical part of regular hearing aid maintenance. Otherwise,  the device could get clogged and be unable to transmit sound effectively as a result. 

In addition to brushing out obvious wax and debris on a daily basis, you'll want to wipe down your hearing aid with a soft, dry cloth each night before plugging it in to charge. We also recommend regularly cleaning your earmold or dome using warm water and a mild soap. Make absolutely certain every single component of your hearing aid is clean and dry before reassembling it.

 

Consider What's Gone Wrong

If you've checked the battery and cleaned out your hearing aid and that still hasn't solved the problem, it's time to take a step back and think a bit more about the issue. Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Is the hearing aid damp? If there's a chance the hearing aid has been exposed to an abnormal degree of moisture, you'll want to immediately put the device in a dry box or use a drying kit. If you don't have access to either of these tools, you can potentially use a hairdryer or leave the hearing aid in a sealed container full of rice overnight. 

  • Am I experiencing whistling or feedback? This could either be caused by an improper fit or malfunctioning components. There may also be a blockage in your ear canal causing interference. 

  • Is there any discomfort or pain? As with feedback, this is likely caused by an improper fit. You may also need to have your earmold or dome resized. 

  • Is the hearing aid too quiet? While this may be due to malfunctioning components, there's also a good chance that your hearing loss may have progressed, meaning your old hearing aid is no longer sufficient.

Your last course of action prior to consulting an audiologist is to readjust the hearing aid yourself. Modern devices usually make this easy through a companion app. However, if you're using an older hearing aid, this is inadvisable at best and likely near impossible without the necessary expertise.

 

When In Doubt, Always Consult an Audiologist

Ultimately, if you have a hearing aid that's malfunctioning or not performing properly, your best bet is almost always to schedule an appointment with your audiologist. They'll be able to troubleshoot it far more effectively than you can. And in the event that the problem is with your ears rather than the hearing aid, they'll be able to help you determine that, as well.

That's where Connect Hearing comes in. Give us a shout, and we'll get you set up with a free consultation with one of our professional audiologists.

 

  

  

  

Do you think you might be suffering from hearing loss? Call or chat today to talk with one of our Hearing Consultants:  

Call #phone#.

  

  

  


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<b>Cleaning & Care Products</b><br> Choose from a selection of wax filters and dryers to extend the life of your hearing aids by keeping them clean and dry.

Cleaning & Care Products
Choose from a selection of wax filters and dryers to extend the life of your hearing aids by keeping them clean and dry.